Recent Changes

Sunday, June 3

Thursday, May 15

  1. page Z edited ... “The concept that all activities are designed to eliminate waste and that any residual waste i…
    ...
    “The concept that all activities are designed to eliminate waste and that any residual waste is recovered to be used as inputs to other processes.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.vancouver2010.com/en/Sustainability/Glossary [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    (view changes)
    6:26 pm
  2. page V edited ... “A group of carbon-containing gases and vapours that are released primarily by the evaporation…
    ...
    “A group of carbon-containing gases and vapours that are released primarily by the evaporation of petroleum products, solvents, paints, and other volatile compounds. VOCs react with NOx in the presence of sunlight to form ground level ozone, which is an air pollutant and a key element of smog. Some VOCs are carcinogenic. VOCs, together with NOx, SOx, fine particulate matter and ammonia are the main air pollutants associated with smog formation.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.vancouver2010.com/en/Sustainability/Glossary [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    (view changes)
    6:25 pm
  3. page U edited ... The UN body responsible for work on human settlement matters. UN-HABITAT web-page is found at…
    ...
    The UN body responsible for work on human settlement matters.
    UN-HABITAT web-page is found at:
    ...
    from: http://www.unhabitat.org/ [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    Urban Penalty
    “It is generally assumed that urban populations are healthier, more literate and more prosperous than rural populations. However, UN-HABITAT’s State of the World’s Cities Report 2006/7 has broken new ground by showing that the urban poor suffer from an urban penalty: Slum dwellers in developing countries are as badly off if not worse off than their rural relatives.”
    SOURCES:
    ...
    from: http://www.unhabitat.org/content.asp?cid=3177&catid=5&typeid=6&subMenuId=0 [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    AND
    ...
    from: http://www.unhabitat.org/pmss/getPage.asp?page=bookView&book=2101 [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    (view changes)
    6:25 pm
  4. page T edited ... “ ‘Transparency’ can be defined as a principle that allows those affected by administrative de…
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    “ ‘Transparency’ can be defined as a principle that allows those affected by administrative decisions, business transactions or charitable work to know not only the basic facts and figures but also the mechanisms and processes. It is the duty of civil servants, managers and trustees to act visibly, predictably and understandably.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    : http://www.transparency.org/news_room/faq/corruption_faq#faqcorr2 [Accessed[Accessed: 07 March 2008].
    AND

    “Transparency, as used in the humanities, implies openness, communication, and accountability. It is a metaphorical extension of the meaning used in the physical sciences: a “transparent” object is one that can be seen through.”
    “Transparency is introduced as a means of holding public officials accountable and fighting corruption. When government meetings are open to the media and the public, when budgets and financial statements may be reviewed by anyone, when laws, rules and decisions are open to discussion, they are seen as transparent and there is less opportunity for the authorities to abuse the system in their own interest.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transparency_(humanities) [Accessed[Accessed: 07 March
    Triple Bottom Line (TBL)
    Developed as a term in 1997 by Sir John Elkington, in his book Cannibals with Forks: The Triple Bottom Line of 21st Century Business. The TBL concept incorporates each of the social, economic, and environmental aspects of sustainable development. “TBL acknowledges that society, economy and environment interact constantly”. The concept is used to provide social, economic and environmental value to governments, businesses and organisations.
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.myhamilton.ca/NR/rdonlyres/F988BA02-9B36-4534-918C-36DC96AF7F9F/0/BrochureTBL.pdf [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    (view changes)
    6:24 pm
  5. page S edited ... SOURCE: (2008). Sustainability: Glossary - Setbacks [online]. Vancouver 2010. Available from:…
    ...
    SOURCE:
    (2008). Sustainability: Glossary - Setbacks [online]. Vancouver 2010. Available from: http://www.vancouver2010.com/en/Sustainability/Glossary [Re-accessed: 07 March 2008].
    Social Audit (definition
    (definition
    / explanation)
    (The SOURCE of the proceeding information is the following:
    Srivastava, K.B. Training module on social audit [online]. UN - FAO [Food and Agricultural Organization] Corporate Document Repository. Available from: http://www.fao.org/docrep/006/ad346e/ad346e09.htm [Re-accessed: 07 March 2008].)
    ...
    SOURCE:
    introduction to sustainability: sustainable dictionary [online]. Sustainable Table. Available from: http://www.sustainabletable.org/intro/dictionary/ [Re-accessed: 07 March 2008].
    SWOT Analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses,
    ...
    and Threats) Analysis
    (All of the proceeding information is taken from the following listed SOURCE:
    What Is A SWOT Analysis? [online]. Strategic and Business Planning Free Resource Centre. Available from: http://www.work911.com/planningmaster/faq/swot.htm [Re-accessed: 07 March 2008].
    (view changes)
    6:22 pm
  6. page S edited ... “Distance from a sensitive ecological feature such as a wetland or stream.” SOURCE: ... fr…
    ...
    “Distance from a sensitive ecological feature such as a wetland or stream.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.vancouver2010.com/en/Sustainability/Glossary [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    Social Audit (definition / explanation)
    (The SOURCE of the proceeding information is the following:
    SOURCE:
    Srivastava,
    Srivastava, K.B. Training
    ...
    from: http://www.fao.org/docrep/006/ad346e/ad346e09.htm [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    “Social audit is based on the principle that democratic local governance should be carried out, as far as possible, with the consent and understanding of all concerned. It is thus a process and not an event.
    A social audit is a way of measuring, understanding, reporting and ultimately improving an organization’s social and ethical performance. A social audit helps to narrow gaps between vision/goal and reality, between efficiency and effectiveness. It is a technique to understand, measure, verify, report on and to improve the social performance of the organization.
    ...
    Objectives of social audit
    1. Assessing the physical and financial gaps between needs and resources available for local development.
    Social Audit, CONTINUED…
    2. Creating awareness among beneficiaries and providers of local social and productive services.
    3. Increasing efficacy and effectiveness of local development programmes.
    ...
    “The practice of operating a business to fulfill a social goal. Organizations that operate this way are also called social enterprises and may be for- profit or not-for-profit entities.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.vancouver2010.com/en/Sustainability/Glossary [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    Stakeholder
    “A person or organization that has a legitimate interest in a project or entity. Also refers to people who could affect or are affected by an organization’s social, environmental and economic performance.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.vancouver2010.com/en/Sustainability/Glossary [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    ...

    Strategic Plan (similar in
    (provides a similar
    structure toused in Sustainable Development Strategies)Strategies.)
    (The SOURCE of the proceeding information is the following:
    SOURCE:
    (2004).
    (2004). Frequently Asked
    ...
    from: http://www.allianceonline.org/FAQ/strategic_planning/what_should_strategic.faq [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    “A strategic plan is simply a document that summarizes, in about ten pages of written text, why an organization [or community] exists, what it is trying to accomplish, and how it will go about doing so. Its "audience" is anyone who wants to know the organization's [or community`s] most important ideas, issues, and priorities…. It is a document that should offer edification and guidance - so, the more concise and ordered the document, the greater the likelihood that it will be useful, that it will be used, and that it will be helpful in guiding the operations of the organization....
    These are the sections commonly included in a strategic plan:
    ...
    Introduction by the[Municipalthe [Municipal President or]
    II. Executive Summary
    III. [Sustainability] Mission and Vision Statements
    IV. [Community or…]Organizationor…] Organization Profile and
    V. Critical Issues and Strategies
    VI. Program Goals and Objectives
    VII. Benchmark and Indicator Statements
    VIII. Appendices.”
    Strategic Planning (similar
    (similar
    in process
    ...
    the following source:
    SOURCE:
    SOURCE:
    (2004). Frequently Asked Questions - Strategic Planning -What are the key concepts and definitions in strategic planning? [online]. Alliance for Nonprofit Management. Available from: http://www.allianceonline.org/FAQ/strategic_planning/what_are_key_concepts.faq [Re-accessed 07 March 2008]. )
    “The major difference between strategic planning and long range planning is in emphasis. Long range planning is generally considered to mean the development of a plan of action to accomplish a goal or set of goals over a period of several years. The major assumption in long range planning is that current knowledge about future conditions is sufficiently reliable to enable the development of these plans…. Because [in long range planning] the [general] environment is [FALSELY] assumed to be predictable, the emphasis is on the articulation of internally focused plans to accomplish agreed upon goals.
    ...
    Strategic Thinking
    “Strategic thinking means asking, "Are we doing the right thing?" It requires three things:
    ...
    to do somethingsomething;
    2. understanding
    ...
    of these endsends; and
    3. creativity in developing effective responses to the opponent or opposing forces.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.allianceonline.org/FAQ/strategic_planning/what_are_key_concepts.faq [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    Sustainability Attributes
    “The qualities or features of a location, building, product or service that make it perform better in relation to sustainability criteria and which make it more attractive to buyers or users with sustainability objectives.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.vancouver2010.com/en/Sustainability/Glossary [Accessed[Accessed: 07 March
    Sustainability Benchmarks & Indicators
    ...
    & Indicators explainare measurement tools. They are an integral component of the “which”Sustainability Strategies of governments, businesses, industry, NGO's and other civil society organisations. They explain the “which”, “when” and "how" of your
    ...
    that is, identifyingthey identify and measure “which” of
    ...
    given) specific date(s). Otherwisedate(s), and "how" you will be able to measure (to identify) whether or not they each have been accomplished.
    Otherwise
    stated, Sustainability
    ...
    a “Time-line” identifying set datesand ways for "measuring" the accomplishment of specified"specified" Sustainability Strategic
    In the development of a Sustainability Strategy, of first importance is the Sustainability Vision, next is the Sustainability Mission, then come the Sustainability Strategic Goals & Objectives, before moving on to these Sustainability Benchmarks & Indicators.
    SOURCE:
    Esakin, Thomas C. (2008). Important Terms, Concepts and International Agreements in Sustainable Development. Citation of unpublished document.
    BenchmarksALSO:
    Benchmarks
    are “evidence-based goals”,goals”...
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hcs-sss/pubs/system-regime/2006-wait-attente/2006-wait-attente-2_e.html [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March 2008].
    which

    ....which
    “... are
    SOURCE:
    SOURCE:
    (2008).
    (2008). Compendium: A
    ...
    from: http://www.iisd.org/measure/compendium/DisplayInitiative.aspx?id=1706 [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March 2008].
    ALSO:

    Benchmarks are
    ...
    community, business, industry, association, or
    ...
    development. Particularly, the movement they
    SOURCE:
    Esakin, Thomas C. (2008). Important Terms, Concepts and International Agreements in Sustainable Development. Citation of unpublished document.
    ALSO:
    “Sustainable development indicators measure sustainability or sustainable development performance” in relation to the benchmarks.
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.iisd.org/ic/info/ss9504.htm [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    Sustainability Management Reporting System (SMRS)
    “A performance-based system that defines sustainability objectives, fosters an integrated approach to achieving them, and provides transparent reporting on results relative to sustainability-related bid commitments and goals, to both internal and external audiences.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.vancouver2010.com/en/Sustainability/Glossary [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    ...

    Sustainability Mission (defined
    (defined
    and explained)
    The

    A Sustainability Mission is an integral part of the Sustainability Strategies of governments, businesses, industry, NGO's and other civil society organisations. The
    Sustainability Mission
    ...
    Sustainability Vision. By necessity, it need balance each of the social, environmental and economic aspects of sustainable development and the organisation's / community's own involvement with any given human society.
    In the development of a Sustainability Strategy, of first importance is the Sustainability Vision, next is this Sustainability Mission, then come the Sustainability Strategic Goals & Objectives, before moving on to the Sustainability Benchmarks & Indicators.
    SOURCE:
    Esakin, Thomas C. (2008). Important Terms, Concepts and International Agreements in Sustainable Development. Citation of unpublished document.
    ALSO:
    “The mission statement is a short, concise statement that describes what the organization [or community] will strive to bring about -- the reason why the company [or community] exists in terms of its impact on the rest of the world. A good mission statement is neither too specific or too general. If a mission statement is too general, people will either not understand what it means, or people will have very different ideas of what the mission statement means. If it's too specific, it may need to be changed too often as the world changes. The mission statement doesn't change very often. It should be a relatively enduring signpost. Also, the mission statement comes from the vision established previously, during strategic planning. It is a condensation of the more vivid vision.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.work911.com/planningmaster/faq/mission.htm [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    (All of the proceeding information is taken from the following listed SOURCE and is adaptable to include all three (3) elements of sustainable development covered in “Sustainability Strategies”, that being each of sustainable development’s social, economic and environmental factors:
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.allianceonline.org/FAQ/strategic_planning/what_s_in_mission_statement.faq [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    [beginning of full quoted text]
    “The Purpose Statement
    ...
    2. an identification of the problem or condition to be changed.
    An example of a purpose statement is "to eliminate homelessness."
    Sustainability Mission, CONTINUED….
    “In defining purpose, it is essential to focus on outcomes and results rather than methods: How is the world going to be different? What is going to change? Thus, the purpose of a mental health counselling agency would never be simply "to provide counselling services," for that is describing a method rather than a result. Rather, the purpose might be "to improve the quality of life" for its clients.
    The Business Statement
    ...
    Below is [an] example of a mission statement which includes all three elements:
    The YMCA of San Francisco, based in Judeo-Christian heritage [values], seeks to enhance the lives of all people [purpose] through programs designed to develop spirit, mind and body [business].
    Sustainability Mission, CONTINUED….
    In addition to the three elements discussed above, you may want to address the following questions in developing your organization's [or community’s] mission statement:
    • What is the problem or need your organization [or community] is trying to address?
    ...
    Mix with passion, humanity and an eye on the big picture, and keep refining the mission statement until you have a version that people can actively support.” [end of full quoted text]
    Sustainability Strategic Goals and Objectives
    ...
    realise your organisation’s(government's, community's, business', industry's, NGO's or community’sany other civil society organisation's) Sustainability Vision,
    ...
    the activities. Sustainability Strategic Goals and Objectives need balance each of the social, environmental and economic aspects of an organisation's or community's involvement with any human society. These Goals and Objectives form an essential part of Sustainability Strategies.
    In the development of a Sustainability Strategy, of first importance is the Sustainability Vision, next is this Sustainability Mission, then come these Sustainability Strategic Goals & Objectives, before moving on to the Sustainability Benchmarks & Indicators.
    SOURCE:
    Esakin, Thomas C. (2008). Important Terms, Concepts and International Agreements in Sustainable Development. Citation of unpublished document.
    ALSO:
    “The strategic goals provide the framework within which the Mission and Vision of the organization are achieved. They are the roadmap for the organization [or community] with important milestones marking the journey.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.baycrest.org/About_Baycrest/Strategic_Plan/Goals_and_Objectives/default.asp [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March 2008].
    Sustainability Strategic Goals and Objectives, CONTINUED...

    ALSO:

    “... goals and objectives are the heart of the ....[sustainability] plan. Mission and vision answer the big questions about why the organization [or community] exists and how it seeks to benefit society, but the goals and objectives are the plan of action - what the organization [or community] intends to "do" over the next few years. As such, ....[these] should serve as a useful guide for operational planning and a reference for evaluation.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.allianceonline.org/FAQ/strategic_planning/what_should_strategic.faq [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March 2008].
    ALSO:

    “The difference between where we are (current status) and where we want to be (vision and goals) is what we do (target objectives and action plans).”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.nsba.org/sbot/toolkit/sgno.html [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March 2008].
    ALSO:

    “Strategic goals are statements of what you wish to achieve over the period of the strategic plan (e.g. over the next year, five years, ten years.) They reflect the analysis you do that starts with creating a vision,... and a mission statement, and then your analysis of your ..... strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.work911.com/planningmaster/faq/whataregoals.htm [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March 2008].
    ALSO:

    “Objectives are usually specific statements (they are actually a particular kind of goal) that contribute to the achievement of "bigger" goals. In other words they are actually goals, but they are more specific. Another term for objectives within a strategic planning framework is to call these "enabling goals", since, if you hit all your objectives, they will contribute to the achievement of the larger strategic goal(s), they enable.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.work911.com/planningmaster/faq/objectives.htm [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    Sustainability Vision
    ...
    a specific and combined social /
    ...
    environmental ideal forto be achieved by an organisation or community; an ideal best developed by its employees or citizens.community. It articulatesidentifies the “what” ana community or government or civil society organisation (whether business, industry, NGO, or communityany other) is striving
    ...
    find itself. A Sustainability Vision is an essential aspect of Sustainability Strategies. The ideal stated in a Sustainability Vision is best developed through the involvement of all interested employees of the organisation or citizens of the community.
    In the development of a Sustainability Strategy, of first importance is this Sustainability Vision, next is the Sustainability Mission, then come the Sustainability Strategic Goals & Objectives, before moving on to the Sustainability Benchmarks & Indicators.
    SOURCE:
    Esakin, Thomas C. (2008). Important Terms, Concepts and International Agreements in Sustainable Development. Citation of unpublished document.
    ALSO:
    “The vision is a means of describing [a] desired future”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.work911.com/planningmaster/faq/vision.htm [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March 2008].
    ALSO:

    “…vision is the most global concept. A vision is quite literally a mental image of the successful accomplishment of the [sustainability] mission, and thus purpose of the organization [sustainability plan].”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.allianceonline.org/FAQ/strategic_planning/what_are_key_concepts.faq [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    AND
    A vision for planning in sustainable development is important as “Strategic planning frameworks are more likely to be successful when they have a long-term vision of sustainable development with transparent objectives, and when they include clear priorities upon which stakeholders agree.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    Sustainable Development Strategies.Strategies: A Resource Book,Book. London: EARTHSCAN.
    Sustainability Vision, CONTINUED...

    ALSO:

    “A vision is a guiding image of success formed in terms of a contribution to society. If a strategic plan is the "blueprint" for an organization's work, then the vision is the "artist's rendering" of the achievement of that plan. It is a description in words that conjures up a similar picture for each member of the group of the destination of the group's work together.” ….A vision statement should be realistic and credible, well articulated and easily understood, appropriate, ambitious, and responsive to change. It should orient the group's energies and serve as a guide to action. It should be consistent with the organization's values. In short, a vision should challenge and inspire the group to achieve its [sustainability] mission.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.allianceonline.org/FAQ/strategic_planning/what_s_in_vision_statement.faq [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March 2008].
    ALSO:

    “Caution: Do not try to write a vision statement with a group. (Groups are great for many things, but writing is not one of them!). Ask one or two people to try drafting a vision statement based on the group's discussion, bring it back to the group, and revise it until you have something that your members can agree on and that your leaders share with enthusiasm.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.allianceonline.org/FAQ/strategic_planning/what_s_in_vision_statement.faq [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    Sustainable Agriculture
    “Farming that provides a secure living for farm families; maintains the natural environment and resources; supports the rural community; and offers respect and fair treatment to all involved, from farm workers to consumers to the animals raised for food.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.sustainabletable.org/intro/dictionary/ [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    Sustainable Cities
    “A sustainable city enhances the economic, social, cultural and environmental well-being of current and future generations.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.icsc.ca/ [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    OR
    “Being a sustainable city means "improving the quality of life in a city, including ecological, cultural, political, institutional, social and economic components without leaving a burden on future generations.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.rec.org/REC/Programs/SustainableCities/ [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    OR
    UN-HABITAT’s “Thrust” of a sustainable city:
    ...
    • An instrument for implementing UNEP's Agenda 21 mission at the city level, and the environmental component of the Habitat Agenda, the Declaration on Cities and other Human Settlements and the Millennium Declaration.
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.unhabitat.org/content.asp?cid=5025&catid=540&typeid=19&subMenuId=0 [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    ...
    Development Strategies (whether local or national)
    (aka Sustainability
    ...
    Local Agenda 21s)21s; whether local or national)
    “A ... sustainable development strategy aims to build upon and harmonize the various sectoral economic, social and environmental policies and plans existing in a... [given geographic area or for a specific organisatiion] ...to ensure socially responsible economic development while protecting the resource base for the benefit of future generations. “
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.un.org/esa/sustdev/natlinfo/indicators/isdms2001/isd-ms2001institutional.htm [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March 2008].
    AND

    Sustainable Development
    ...
    through a far-reaching, inclusive, bottom-up, two-way, consultative process thatprocess: one which purposely seeks
    ...
    engage all knownidentified segments and interested members of a community if undertaken by government (or of an organisation, if a businessit is undertaken for business, industry, NGOs or NGO) ANDany other civil society entity). The broad involvement of stakeholders (whether friend or foe) is considered essential to these strategies, for to achieve degrees of success by advancing sustainable development, they must have local support and willing local participation. Sustainable Development Strategies include a
    SOURCE:
    Esakin, Thomas C. (2008). Important Terms, Concepts and International Agreements in Sustainable Development. Citation of unpublished document.
    AND
    Core principles of Sustainable Development Strategies
    (SOURCE for the proceeding information:
    ...
    “Sustainable purchasing involves the consideration of social, ethical and environmental criteria in addition to other operational criteria in the selection and monitoring of suppliers, contractors and licensees. In a social compliance program the emphasis is on ensuring human rights and safe workplaces. When third party experts visit factories to assess compliance, it is called independent factory monitoring.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.vancouver2010.com/en/Sustainability/Glossary [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    Sustainable Table
    Sustainable eating, which takes in to account the social, economic and environmental aspects of all food you select for eating at your own kitchen table.
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.sustainabletable.org/intro/dictionary/ [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) Analysis
    ...
    following listed source:
    SOURCE:
    SOURCE:
    What Is
    ...
    from: http://www.work911.com/planningmaster/faq/swot.htm [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    “SWOT is a strategic planning tool, usually used as part of doing an environmental [i.e. a complete economic, social and environmental] scan, that help identify external factors that need to be planned for, and internal factors (i.e. strengths and weaknesses) that need to be planned for in determining where a business [or community] should be going in the future.
    More specifically, the process involves identifying STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES, AND THREATS (which is what the letters SWOT stand for).
    ...
    4. people are not subject to conditions that systematically undermine their capacity to meet their needs.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.naturalstep.ca/system-conditions.html [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    Systems Thinking
    “…recogniz[es] that what happens in one part of a system affects every other part…. [Understanding the broader system within which problems occur and the principles governing success within that system. These principles for success then provide a practical set of design criteria that can be used to direct social, environmental and economic actions…”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    : http://www.naturalstep.ca/understanding-sustainability.html [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
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  7. page R edited ... “The areas adjacent to streams, lakes, and wetlands that influence and are influenced by the a…
    ...
    “The areas adjacent to streams, lakes, and wetlands that influence and are influenced by the adjoining waterway. Riparian areas are important because of the influence they have on aquatic ecosystems – providing shade, stabilizing banks, contributing large and small debris, regulating runoff and sedimentation – and because they provide rich and important habitat for a variety of creatures.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.vancouver2010.com/en/Sustainability/Glossary [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
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  8. page P edited ... “The precautionary approach/principle is a distinctive approach to managing threats of serious…
    ...
    “The precautionary approach/principle is a distinctive approach to managing threats of serious or irreversible harm where there is scientific uncertainty. It is not new - what is new is the increasing complexity of the science and the public debate about the ability of governments to respond to such situations. The precautionary approach/principle recognizes that the absence of full scientific certainty shall not be used as a reason to postpone decisions where there is a risk of serious or irreversible harm. Even though scientific information may be inconclusive, decisions have to be made to meet society's expectations that risks be addressed and living standards maintained.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.ec.gc.ca/econom/pamphlet_e.htm [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    OR
    (SEE ALSO: the NAFTA`s Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC), for a thorough academic / legal review on the precautionary principle / approach, as found at:
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  9. page P edited ... “·Where there are threats of serious of irreversible damage, lack of full scientific certainty…
    ...
    “·Where there are threats of serious of irreversible damage, lack of full scientific certainty shall not be used as a reason for postponing cost-effective measures to prevent environmental degradation.”
    SOURCE:
    ...
    from: http://www.un.org/documents/ga/conf151/aconf15126-1annex1.htm [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 06 March
    OR
    “The precautionary approach/principle is a distinctive approach to managing threats of serious or irreversible harm where there is scientific uncertainty. It is not new - what is new is the increasing complexity of the science and the public debate about the ability of governments to respond to such situations. The precautionary approach/principle recognizes that the absence of full scientific certainty shall not be used as a reason to postpone decisions where there is a risk of serious or irreversible harm. Even though scientific information may be inconclusive, decisions have to be made to meet society's expectations that risks be addressed and living standards maintained.”
    ...
    (2001). A Canadian Perspective on the Precautionary Approach / Principle [online]. Environment Canada. Available from: http://www.ec.gc.ca/econom/pamphlet_e.htm [Re-accessed 07 March 2008].
    OR
    Precautionary Principle OR Precautionary Approach, CONTINUED
    (SEE ALSO: the NAFTA`s Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC), for a thorough academic / legal review on the precautionary principle / approach, as found at:
    ...
    from: http://www.cec.org/files/PDF/LAWPOLICY/NAELP10_en.pdf [Re-accessed[Re-accessed: 07 March
    (view changes)
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